Favorite Wood Chaise Lounges

Submitted by Ana White on Sun, 06/02/2019 - 15:39
Difficulty
Intermediate
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Make your own wood outdoor chaise lounge for a fraction of the cost to buy! Free step by step DIY plans from Ana-White.com

wood chaise lounges built from plans and painted white
wood chaise lounge plans side view
wood chaise lounge side tune reclined
wood chaise lounge plans one flat, one reclined
front view of wood chaise lounges
back rest for wood chaise lounge

These beautiful and inexpensive outdoor lounge chairs were designed by Ana White and built by Brook over at Being Brook 

We really wanted to make these chaise lounges very affordable, so they are 24" wide to conserve wood - made of 1x3s which tend to be significantly cheaper than their slightly larger buddies, 1x4s.

The frame itself is made of sturdy 2x6s, and we used a simple bolt for the hinge.  Can you see it?

To get the back to rest at different angles, there is notch-outs that fit a 2x4.

And then you can go into full recline mode and the stop block fits under the back legs!!!  

Of course we have the plans right here for you - but please, take a second and stop over and read Brook's post on building these lounge chairs and her tips and tricks!  Thanks Brook!

Dimensions
dimensional diagram for wood chaise lounge
Dimensions shown above

Preparation

Shopping List

2 - 2x6 @ 9 feet long (can be 9 foot studs)

3 – 2x4 @ 8 feet long

8 – 1x3 @ 8 feet long

2 – ¼” bolts 4” long with nuts and 6 washers

2-3/4” self tapping exterior wood screws

2” exterior screws or galvanized brad nails and glue to nail slats down with

Cut List

BASE

2 – 2x6 @ 85” - main frame sides

2 – 2x6 @ 21” - main frame front/back

16 – 1x3 @ 24” - seat slats

6 – 2x4 @ 14” - legs

2 – 2x4 @ 7” - legs

 

BACK

2 – 2x4 @ 32” - back frame

3 – 2x4 @ 17 ½” - back frame

7 – 1x3 @ 37 ½” - back slats

1 – 2x4 @ 24” (stop block)

Tools
Tape Measure
Speed Square
Pencil
Safety Glasses
Hearing Protection
Drill
Jigsaw
Brad Nailer
Power Sander

Instructions

Step 1

Build your frames first. You can use 1 1/2" PHs and 2 1/2" PH screws OR 2-3/4" countersunk screws.

I do recommend the PHs because it will hide your screws holes, making it easier to paint the pieces, and then attach later through the PHs.

NOTE: The diagrams show 2x4s.  We have updated this plan per user recommendations to use 2x6s for the frame.  

Notch out for the back support with a jigsaw.

Step 2

Next add your slats. You can also attach slats from underneath with PHs if desired.

Step 3

Attach legs, and then to front, attach second row of legs. Use 2 3/4" self tapping screws and glue here.

Multiple screws are recommended to keep the leg joints solid.

Step 4

These legs are just long enough to provide you a spot to put the stop block when chaise is fully reclined.

Step 5

Build the frame for the seat back as you did the main frame.

Step 6

Attach back slats to the frame.

TIP: Users have commented that it is easier to install the seat frame on the pivot bolt first, then add the slats later.

Step 7

Now we attach back to chaise with the pivot bolt.  The easiest way to do this for me was to clamp the pieces in place and drill through both the main frame and the seat frame.

 

NOTE: The diagram shows a 2x4 - we have upgraded this plan to recommend using a 2x6 instead. 

Step 8

Brook is also sharing with us her step by step finishing tutorial here to get this amazing finish!

Step 9

Here is the diagram for the stop block.

Comments

markw

Wed, 06/06/2012 - 12:33

What are the measurements/locations of the stop block notches in the base frame? The first step says to add them in a later step, but I'm not seeing that step - or did I miss something :)

Liquid6 (not verified)

Fri, 06/08/2012 - 06:37

You will need 2 - 1/4" bolts that are 4 inches long. You will need 2 nuts to match the threading on 2 bolts. You will also need 6 washers with 1/4" holes.

Start on the outside. Thread one bolt through a washer, slide the bolt through the whole on the outside rail, add one more washer, add the back of the chair, add another washer and then the nut on the end. This should allow the back to move independently.

May I recommend you use stainless steel hardware.

FlyingMatilda

Thu, 06/14/2012 - 11:59

Great plans! I'd love to see a modification for a little slide-out desk like the one from World Market! But if I had a great big stump, I'd use it for a side-table instead, too...totally cute. Great plans, wish I had time to do this this season...maybe next!

Theo Rioles (not verified)

Wed, 06/20/2012 - 04:19

hi--bought the 2.5" Kreg screws to affix the slats: went straight up through! set jig at 1.5"...

Theo Rioles (not verified)

Wed, 06/20/2012 - 05:23

hi--bought the 2.5" Kreg screws to affix the slats: went straight up through! set jig at 1.5"...

EleyAnn (not verified)

Mon, 06/25/2012 - 12:23

From someone whose big accomplishment this year was learning how to use a dremmel to build a pinewood derby car (cute but not fast), I have a few layman questions . . .

1. The plans provide specifications, but do not indicate the type of wood . . . does that matter?

2. Does the type of wood contribute to the life of the chaise lounger? Or do other things matter like stain/paint?

3. My husband is a big guy 220-240 lbs . . . provided I can actually build it correctly, will it hold his weight?

Thank youI love this site and if I can pull this off, I think I will double major in mommying and wood shop and build lots more stuff!

Tami220 (not verified)

Mon, 08/27/2012 - 10:15

These are great questions...was a reply ever sent? I wouold like to know the answers as well :)

Thanks
Tami

In reply to by EleyAnn (not verified)

jigganancy

Mon, 08/27/2012 - 11:13

1. The plans provide specifications, but do not indicate the type of wood . . . does that matter?
... usually, no.

2. Does the type of wood contribute to the life of the chaise lounger? Or do other things matter like stain/paint?
... if it's outdoor, yes. It's good to use cedar or pressure treated outside. Waterproofing staining is supposed to last longer than paint.

3. My husband is a big guy 220-240 lbs . . . provided I can actually build it correctly, will it hold his weight?
... when building your own furniture, sometimes its trial and error. My finance is about 200 lbs and sits on the chaise just fine. If you're really concerned, you might want to tweek the legs or the support with beefier wood like 2x4.