A Frame Chicken Coop Tractor

Submitted by Ana White on Thu, 06/20/2019 - 11:11
Difficulty
Beginner
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How to build A Frame Chicken Coop - portable and small with built in nesting box and perch. You'll love our easy to follow free plans from Ana-White.com. Builders spend about $100 building this coop.

A frame chicken coop
a frame chicken coop inside flipped down door

Scramble made it up the ladder yesterday.

Our girls - French Toast, Sunny, Easy and we hope Scramble is indeed a lady too - have been enjoying this simple, easy to make and portable A Frame style chicken coop for about a month now.

a frame chicken coop plans

 

 

Dimensions
a frame chicken coop dimensions
Dimensions are shown above. Suitable for 2-4 Chickens.

Preparation

Shopping List
  • 14 - 2x4s, 8 feet long
  • 1 - sheet 3/4" t1-11
  • 6 total T-Strap hinges
  • 30 feet of 30" wide chicken wire (I used 36" because I couldn't find 30" locally)
  • 2 3/4" exterior self tapping deck screws
  • 1/2" exterior staples for chicken wire
  • scrap plywood piece for floor of upstairs coop and ladder
  • Optional 1x2s for trim out if desired
Cut List
  • 6 - 2x4 @ 64" (Long point measurement, top end cut at 60 degrees off square, bottom end cut at 30 degrees off square)
  • 6 - 2x4 @ 96" 2 - 2x4 @ 64" (Long point measurement, both ends cut at 30 degrees off square)
  • 5 - 2x4 @ 32" (Long point measurement, both ends cut at 30 degrees off square)
  • 4 - pieces t1-11 siding cut into 24" x 48" pieces
  • Optional 1x2 trim
Tools
Tape Measure
Speed Square
Pencil
Safety Glasses
Hearing Protection
Drill
Circular Saw
Staple Gun
Drill Bit Set
General Instructions

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Instructions

Step 1

Cutting the top angle is going to be a pain - I know - if your miter saw does not cut 60 degree angles. What you will need to do is mark the angles with your square and then cut with a circular saw. Remember, it's 60 degrees off square.

Once you have your rafters cut, then you can simply attach the side support boards. NOTE: I left a 24 1/2" gap for 24" wide t1-11 - you may wish to leave a slightly wider gap for easier access to the upstairs coop - or you can cut your plywood down to fit.

Another trick here is to cover the bottom with chicken wire. These things are always easier done now rather than when you are inside the coop :)

Step 2

Once you have the two walls built, just attach at base with base supports. Then attach tops with countersunk screws.

Step 3

Thes are really going to add a ton of strength to the coop! And make a floor for the upstairs room. Attach from outside with the 2 3/4" exterior screws.

Step 4

Now add the doors. For mine, we used two full doors, but a better idea would be to split the doors into two so accessing the different sections is easier.

NOTE: We trimmed out the doors in 1x3s for added strength and because the hinges we had required it.

Step 5

Finishing Instructions
Preparation Instructions
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth.

It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

Comments

Michael S (not verified)

Sun, 08/12/2012 - 15:40

Did it this morning! Took 7 hours after getting the materials. Few notes:

- Cutting the 60 degree angles correctly represented the most significant preparation component.
- Biggest time eater was the cloth wire. I got durable cloth and stapled it on the inside.
- It is much much heavier than expected.

Modifications:
- I added wheels to the back for use it as a run/tractor.
- I split the doors into four, two on each side, which required trimming using 1x3s for strength and to accommodate the hinges.

Cost about $150 total (material purchased at Lowes)

Meg Smith (not verified)

Tue, 09/25/2012 - 11:57

I am planning to build this coop this weekend with a couple modifications already in mind:

-I will be using 1x3s for the side support boards and bottom base supports.
-2x3s for the rafters and floor braces
-Finish out the upstairs before dealing with doors.
-Adding handles, which used to be wooden curtain rods, to be installed underneath the upstairs support beams
-I will be using two pieces of a shipping crate for the doors, so they will jut like eaves over the middle support board.
-And lastly, I plan to make a door on the wheeled end so the chickens can come and go if they ever have a chance to free range.

Annemieke (not verified)

Sun, 09/30/2012 - 03:23

Made this chicken coop. We did ours in hardwood and used marine ply for the roof. We also split the doors (so 2 each side) and did the triangular door to the egg section. We also put a door at the bottom to make it easier to let them out and free range. It turned out more expensive and it very heavy but we managed to pull it along with the ride on lawn mower!! The 3 bantam hens are in there and have already made themselves at home. Thanks for the plans!

Tara Humara (not verified)

Wed, 10/03/2012 - 16:33

It turned out really nice; thank you! But...

This chicken coop took forever to build.. my boyfriend and I did it in a couple days maybe 6 hours each day. I'm impaired when it comes to building anything and scared of power tools. It did turn out really nice, but it was not an easy project. I'm really surprised that we didn't kill each other with the saw or drill. I know a few times I thought about hitting him with a 2 x 4 for making fun of me because I couldn't figure out how a support board fit into the frame or because I was putting the hinges on backwards. He cut one of the boards short though, ha! But I can't use a t-square and wanted to pitch it over the fence.

He'll read this and laugh I'm sure.

It was a really good project though, and maybe after he was done saying the B word a million times our relationship is actually better than before. :)

Michael M (not verified)

Thu, 11/15/2012 - 17:47

Great design, like many others I made a few modifications ... doors for upstairs and downstairs, and a fixed corrugated metal roof. curtain rod for roosting.

I have a question about egg laying. We have three young chickens all different breeds, they are now right about at the age where they should start laying, horrible timing too as it is now getting really cold! The upstairs has a nice straw layer for them, and they sleep up there. They do use the roost occasionally but not at night as far as I can tell. Did anyone add any kind of nest box? I assumed that the whole upstairs would be the nest/egg area (this is our first time having chickens). It fills up with poop pretty fast so we clean it out regularly and replace the straw. Also threw in a few golf balls to send them a message that they should start laying up there. Thinking about putting a heat lamp in too.

Trying to be patient. Am I doing it right??

tashmoore

Sun, 07/19/2015 - 04:58

I know you have probably already figured this out, but for any newbies reading this chickens need a seperate place to nest. Away from the poop. That is one thing I don't like about this design (the other thing is it only holds 4 chickens, which is good for the city, but I live in the country :) ). You could get a milk crate or a small cat litter box (12X12 at least) and fill it with straw or wood chips and put your golf balls in there. When they are ready to lay they will lay, and even with a nest box they might not lay in the 'right place' right away. Just leave the golf balls (or dummy eggs) and they will figure it out eventually.

Michael M (not verified)

Thu, 11/15/2012 - 17:49

Great design, like many others I made a few modifications ... doors for upstairs and downstairs, and a fixed corrugated metal roof. curtain rod for roosting.

I have a question about egg laying. We have three young chickens all different breeds, they are now right about at the age where they should start laying, horrible timing too as it is now getting really cold! The upstairs has a nice straw layer for them, and they sleep up there. They do use the roost occasionally but not at night as far as I can tell. Did anyone add any kind of nest box? I assumed that the whole upstairs would be the nest/egg area (this is our first time having chickens). It fills up with poop pretty fast so we clean it out regularly and replace the straw. Also threw in a few golf balls to send them a message that they should start laying up there. Thinking about putting a heat lamp in too.

Trying to be patient. Am I doing it right??

suthap klomrod (not verified)

Sun, 01/20/2013 - 02:03

It wasn't until I found this site that I finally completed my chicken coop project. Learn how to build your own chicken coop and start raising chickens in your own backyard. Details here http://bit.ly/UpVkyz