Modern Adirondack Chair

Submitted by Ana White on Fri, 06/07/2019 - 12:46
Difficulty
Beginner
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This modern style Adirondack chair plan features clean lines and simple materials.  The base is sturdy and substantial 2x6s, so it will hold heavy weights and won't blow away in the wind. You'll love our step by step plans and diagrams.  

modern adirondack chairs painted green

Reader submitted photo by HARLEYANDCHRISTINA 

 

Modern Adirondack Chair Features

  • Modern Styling
  • Deep recline for enhanced relaxation
  • 2x6 base framing for increased strength, durability, and weight
  • 2x4 legs will last longer and hold more weight
  • Simple angle cut construction that is easy to build

 

Modern Adirondack Chair Plans

This is an updated plan.  If you need the old version of this plan, you can find it here.

Dimensions
dimensions diagram for modern outdoor chair
Dimensions are shown in the above diagram

Preparation

Shopping List
  • Cedar wood or other exterior appropriate is recommended.  You can use whitewood or spruce - just make sure the wood is finished well.
  • 1 - 2x6 @ 9 feet long or 9 foot stud length
  • 1 - 2x4 @ 4 feet long
  • 1 - 2x2 @ 8 feet long
  • 1 - 1x6 @ 8 feet long
  • 2 - 1x4 @ 8 feet long
  • 8 - 2-1/2" pocket hole screws (recommended but can substitute for 2-3/4" self tapping wood screws)
  • 25 - 2-3/4" exterior self tapping wood screws
  • 70 - 2" exterior self tapping wood screws

 

 

Common Materials
120 grit sandpaper
primer
wood conditioner
paint
paint brush
Cut List
  • 2 – 2×6 @ 29-1/2″ (Stringers, cut in step 1)
  • 1 – 2×6 @ 21″ (Front Apron)
  • 1 - 2x6 @ 18" - (Base Support)
  • 2 – 2×4 @ 18″ (Legs, ends cut at 20 degrees off square, ends ARE parallel, long point to short point measurement)
  • 2 - 2x2 @ 24-3/16" - (Arm Supports, both ends cut at 20 degrees off square, long point to short point measurement, ends ARE parallel)
  • 1 - 2x2 @ 24" - (Back Support)
  • 3 - 1x6 @ 32" - (Back Slats)
  • 1 - 1x4 @ 18" - (Seat Back Top)
  • 5 - 1x4 @ 21" (Seat Slats)
  • 2 - 1x4 @ 23-1/2" (Arm Rests)

 

Tools
Tape Measure
Speed Square
Pencil
Safety Glasses
Hearing Protection
Drill
Circular Saw
Miter Saw
Power Sander

Instructions

Step 1

Mark out the stringer pattern on 2x6 stringer boards.

Cut angles with a circular saw.

Cut two matching.

Step 2

Attach stringer to front apron.  Pocket holes would be hidden and recommended, but you can also use 2-3/4" self tapping wood screws.

Step 3

Add the back aprons support between the stringers.

Step 4

Cut legs on compound miter saw.

Attach to the base with 2-3/4" screws.

Step 5

Attach 2x2 side supports with 2-3/4" screws, making sure the 2x2s are level all the way back.

Step 6

Use 2-3/4" screws to attach the back support between the arm supports.

Step 7

Add the two outside back slats with 2" self tapping wood screws.

Step 8

Attach top with 2" self tapping wood screws.

Step 9

Center remaining back slat in between and attach with 2" self tapping wood screws.

Step 10

Lay seat slats and screw down with 2" self tapping wood screws.

TIP: Attach the front and back slats.  Then attach the center slat.  Then center the remaining two in between.

Finishing Instructions
Preparation Instructions
We recommend pre-finishing boards.

Comments

lunadaat (not verified)

Sat, 01/01/2011 - 21:28

Are there plans for the foot stools and side table in the pic with all the colored ones? I was wanted to build a sofa size and 2 of the chairs but I would like the side tables and foot stools too.

razvan (not verified)

Tue, 01/11/2011 - 12:18

Dear Ana,
I appreciate very much your articles and most of all your achivements . I am from Europe (Romania)and as a beginer I try to do a Sharp Adirondack Chair following your instructions. I notice that if I cut the front legs to 15 degree ,paralel to each other , the high of the chair will not be 19 3/8 ( 48,4 cm) but much shorter .
It's really 15 degrees cut off , or maybe 1,5 degrees ???
Thank you in advance for your answer.
Regards
Razvan

razvan (not verified)

Mon, 01/17/2011 - 11:19

Dear Ana,
Sorry , I want to say ............." the high of the legs will not be 19 3/8...."
Regards
Razvan

Guest (not verified)

Thu, 04/14/2011 - 20:40

I guess I have a question and a comment.  First, the comment.  I made the chair the other day and it was rather simple and looks very nice.  Thanks for all the detailed instructions.  Now for the question.  For the sofa, I see where you add the additional support for the seat, but I'm not understanding what you are saying about the back.

Helga from Austria (not verified)

Sat, 11/12/2011 - 17:07

I'm in love with your Adiron Chairs... :-)

and wanted to be able to make also such as one, (I'm
a absolute beginner)
Unfortunately your drawings are not in metric measurement.

Kind regards :-)

Helga

In reply to by Helga from Austria (not verified)

claydowling

Sat, 11/12/2011 - 18:25

I'm from the U.S., but I've bought a couple of plans from a Canadian woodworker that have measurements in a mix of imperial and metric units. While I'm comfortable working in both systems, conversions are always prone to inaccuracy, and his plans are as much engineering as woodworking.

My solution is to use metric measuring equipment. For the most part I have to mail order it from Canada (although perversely my nice metric ruler is made in the U.S.).

You could do the same in reverse. Some woodworking supplier in Australia will be selling measuring tools marked in imperial units. A folding rule would probably be sufficient, since a good one can measure two or three meters, which should be sufficient. I would check out Japanwoodworker.com, which sells to both Japanese and American woodworkers, and I think they have a presence in Australia.

I think your lumber there is actually marked in imperial units, probably because a significant portion of lumber in the world comes from the U.S. and Canada. I've seen the dimensions given backwards though. I don't know if that's Australians having some sport with Americans, or legitimately what is done. In any event, if you see lumber marked at 4x2, it's equivalent to our 2x4 lumber.

Helga from Upp… (not verified)

Sun, 11/13/2011 - 02:21

Thank you Claydowling, thats very nice, I'll try
to find a woodworker because I'm beginner.....

I live in the small country Austria not in Australia :-)

Have a nice day :-)

Helga

Guest (not verified)

Tue, 11/15/2011 - 17:53

Cut ends off square so that they're parallel... Cut ends off square so that they're perpendicular... You have a lot of plans, but all of them have errors.. Slow your posting down, and correct the errors first, rather than rushing to get a lot online