Modish Adirondack Chair

Submitted by Ana White on Mon, 05/24/2010 - 11:55
Difficulty
Beginner
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About Project

Well, you found it! My most favorite Adirondack Chairs! I can't stop building these! So simple, so easy to build, yet amazingly comfortable!

Special thanks to Fiona and Lael for sharing their amazing photos.

I'm totally in love with these chairs that Amy built

ACTUAL READER PHOTOS
Aren't they fantastic?  And I know many others are building these chairs too, and if I wasn't putting a roof on a playhouse, I'd be cutting boards too.

ADIRONDACK CHAIR PLANS, ANA STYLE
Amy used the plans here to build these chairs.  But I also had created a very similar version, and although I personally loved the design above the most (and that's why I blogged the plans first), I wanted to also give you the option of a slightly different, tad edgier, and a little lazier design

POTTERY BARN vs WEST ELM
The major difference with this design is it's got a slightly more modern influence.  Think Pottery Barn vs West Elm.  Like these. And the chair above is built without creating a curved lip, so the edge is going to be a little sharper.  But the chair above is also going to be easier to build because of the sharper edge.  We'll call this the Sharp Adirondack Chair.

SIDE BY SIDE

Here are the two chairs side be side.  Standard outdoor lounge seat height is 15", with the Original plan on the left coming in at 15 1/2" high, and the Sharp Adirondack Chair at 14 1/2".  Both seats have the same dimensions.  The purpose of adding this chair to the collection is to give you options.  If there is enough interest, I would be happy to add the child sized plan to this collection.

COMPARATIVE COSTS AND SKILL LEVEL
Costs are going to be very similar, with the Sharp Adirondack Chair being just slightly less.  But the Sharp Adirondack Chair is going to also be a little easier to build.

Dimensions
Dimensions are shown in the above diagram

Preparation

Shopping List

1 – 1×6, 8′ Length
4 – 1×4, 8′ Length
1 – 1×2, 8′ Length
1 – 1×3, 8′ Length
2″ Screws
1 1/4″ Screws
Wood Glue
Wood Filler

Common Materials
120 grit sandpaper
primer
wood conditioner
paint
paint brush
Cut List

2 – 1×6 @ 33 3/4″ (Stringers, cut in step 1)
1 – 1×6 @ 21″ (Front Apron)
5 – 1×4 @ 21” (Seat Slats)
5 – 1×4 @ 30 1/2″ (Seat Back Slats)
2 – 1×4 @ 19 1/2″ (Seat Back Supports)
1 – 1×2 @ 22 1/2″ (Seat Back Center Support)
2 – 1×4 @ 19 1/4″ (Legs, ends cut at 15 degrees off square parallel)
2 – 1×2 @ 21 3/4″ (Arm Supports, ends cut at 15 degrees off square parallel)
2 – 1×3 @ 21 3/4″ (Arm Rests

Tools
Tape Measure
Speed Square
Pencil
Safety Glasses
Hearing Protection
Drill
Circular Saw
Miter Saw
Power Sander
General Instructions

Cut your boards and dry fit together. Finish the boards to seal all edges and to make finishing easier (it would be very difficult to paint your chair as a finished product). Work on a clean level surface. Check your project for square as you go along. Predrill and countersink your screws, using glue on all permanent joints. Work safely.

Instructions

Step 1

STRINGERS
Cut your stringers as shown above.

Step 2

FRONT APRON
Fasten the front apron to the fronts of the stringers as shown above.

Step 3

SEAT SLATS
Fasten the seat slats as shown above in the diagram, using 2″ screws and glue.

Step 4

SEAT BACK
Build the seat back as shown above, using 1 1/4″ screws and glue.

Step 5

Step 6

LEGS
Cut the front legs at 15 degrees off square on both ends, so that the ends are perpendicular. Mark as shown above in purple. Then from the inside of the seat, fasten the legs to the aprons.

Step 7

ARM SUPPORTS
Cut your arm supports with both ends cut at 15 degrees off square, ends are parallel to each other. Fasten to the top edge of the legs and to the seat back as shown above.

Step 8

ARM RESTS
Attach your arm rests to your arms, using glue and 1 1/4″ screws.

Step 9

FINISHED TOP EDGE
If you have a Kreg Jig™, you could easily finish the top edge of the back as shown above by simply moving the back top support board to the top.

Step 10

SOFA LENGTH
This chair plan can easily be converted to a five foot long sofa with just a few quick steps. I really love this styled sofa.

You will need to cut 10 more back slats and add 40″ to the length of the seat slats, front apron, and back supports. Of course, you could make your sofa shorter, but I would not go any longer.

Step 11

In addition, you will need to add supports under the seats as shown above. Make sure you also screw from the seat slats into the supports.

You should also add back support in the form of strong backs between the arms on the back to keep the back from pushing backward.

Step 12

And of course, you can trim the top out all cute and such!

Finishing Instructions
Preparation Instructions
Your boards are most likely already finished. You can add a touch up coat by filling any exposed holes with wood filler or paintable silicone, lightly sanding, and painting over the chair.
Project Type
Room

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