Simple Outdoor Dining Table

Submitted by Ana White on Thu, 04/22/2010 - 19:39
Difficulty
Beginner
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Build your own outdoor table!  This simple plan requires on special tools and is beginner friendly!  Build and enjoy this weekend!  Free plans by ANA-WHITE.com

Built and photographed by Mr Thompson

This modern style outdoor table is easy to build.  The matching bench plans are available here.

Dimensions
Overall Dimensions are shown above.

Preparation

Shopping List

5 – 1×4 Boards, 12 feet long (Cut Tabletop Boards from these)

5 – 1×4, 8 feet long (Supports and Aprons)

1 – 2x4, 12 feet long

1-1/4″ self tapping exterior wood Screws

2" self tapping exterior wood Screws

2-1/2″ self tapping exterior wood screws

Wood Glue

Wood Filler

Finishing Supplies

Cut List

2 – 1×4 @ 32 1/2″ (End Aprons)

4 – 1×4 @ 64 1/2″ (Supports)

2 – 1×4 @ 60 1/2″ (Side Aprons)

17 – 1×4 @ 35 1/2″ (Tabletop Boards)

4- 2×4 @ 29 1/4″ (Legs)

Tools
Tape Measure
Speed Square
Pencil
Safety Glasses
Hearing Protection
Kreg Jig
Drill
Circular Saw
Power Sander
Level
General Instructions

Work on a clean level surface. Check for square after each step. Use good straight boards. Predrill and countersink your screws. Use glue unless otherwise directed. Use proper safety precautions and equipment.

Instructions

Step 1

Aprons and Support. Build the aprons and supports for the tabletop as shown above. Use glue and 2″ screws. Make sure the project is very square.

Step 2

Outer Side Aprons. Fasten the outer side aprons to the sides, as shown above, keeping top and bottom edges flush. There will be a 2 3/4″ gap on both ends, as shown above.

Step 3

Tabletop boards. Use 2″ screws and glue to fasten the tabletop pieces to the aprons and supports. It is wise to mark all the joints on the undersides of the tabletop boards before fastening. There will be a 1/2″ gap between boards. If you happen to have a Kreg Jig™, you can fasten from underneath. (Kreg Jig™ K4 Pocket Hole System). This will hide all of your screw holes. As one reader mentioned, examining your boards and facing the board so the bark side is up will help prevent cupping in the future, and also create better water drainage.

Step 4

Legs. Screw the legs on with 2 1/2″ screws. If you leave the glue off or use bolts, you can make the legs removable.

Step 5

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Comments

Shadoglare

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 21:47

So less than two years after I built it, this table went in the trash last weekend. It appears pine is no match for midwest weather, even with a thick coating of outdoor paint. The wood had gone bad already and the table pretty much collapsed on itself when my wife put a bunch of plants on it while working in the garden - thus pretty much turning this project into a huge waste of time & money.

rnfryrlife

Mon, 05/11/2015 - 08:38

Do you have plans to make this for 8? I am new at this and not very confident in making my own adjustments. Also, I made the picnic table from pressure treated wood. Didn't think about it not being safe to eat on. I did paint it . What do you recommend for outdoor furniture that is outside in coastal weather? Any recommendations for the best sealer to use?
It needs to last? thanks

NatEllis65

Sun, 07/19/2015 - 16:00

I made this with some leftover Tigerwood deck material.  I adjusted the legs to redwood 4x4.  Made the matching benches with the same material, but modified the legs to 2x4 redwood.

genegenie7

Fri, 05/06/2016 - 07:29

I love it too, but where are the plans to do the modified square table with the prependicular design? Sorry but maybe I just haven't looked deep enough into the site!

Thanks

 

 

ramacb

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 22:59

Great plan - functional table. What type of wood is recommended for outdoor tables/ chairs like these? Especially for california weather. Also is there a plan for the chair?