60" Round Dining Table Top

Submitted by Ana White on Sun, 03/22/2020 - 10:51
Difficulty
Intermediate
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Build your own 60" round dining table top using 1x6 boards.  We've had this round dining table top for a couple of years and it is holding up well and is very beautiful.  You can pair it with any base that is at least 36" or standard dining table legs with aprons. 

Build your own dining table top

We switched over to a round dining table a couple of years ago, and we have LOVED it.  Not only does it feel cozy and comfortable with just our family of five, but it's easy to squeeze in 8-10 around it.  

We built our own 60" round dining table top, and it has held up extremely well over the last couple of years, despite heavy use from a family that lives, works and homeschools at home.  The photo in this post was taken this week - it still looks brand new!  

Here's how to build your own 60" round dining table top.

Dimensions
diy round dining table top tutorial
60" round dining table top, 1-1/2" thick

Preparation

Shopping List
  • 5 - 1x6 @ 8 feet long
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 10 feet long
  • 1 - 1x6 @ 6 feet long
  • 1-1/4" pocket hole screws (about 100)
  • 1-1/4" staples or brad nails
  • wood glue
Cut List

For 1x6 boards that are 5-1/2" wide

  • 8 - 1x6 @ 24-7/8" longest point to longest point measurement, both ends cut at 22-1/2" degree angle, ends NOT parallel (frame boards)
  • 5 - 1x6 @ 60"
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 57-3/8" - both ends cut at 45 degrees off square, ends not parallel, long point to long point measurement
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 46-3/8" - both ends cut at 45 degrees off square, ends not parallel, long point to long point measurement
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 35-3/8" - both ends cut at 45 degrees off square, ends not parallel, long point to long point measurement

For 1x6 boards that are 5-1/4" wide

  • 8 - 1x6 @ 24" longest point to longest point measurement, both ends cut at 22-1/2" degree angle, ends NOT parallel (frame boards)
  • 5 - 1x6 @ 58"
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 55-3/4" - both ends cut at 45 degrees off square, ends not parallel, long point to long point measurement
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 45-1/4" - both ends cut at 45 degrees off square, ends not parallel, long point to long point measurement
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 34-3/4" - both ends cut at 45 degrees off square, ends not parallel, long point to long point measurement

For both tabletops, 3/4" plywood is recommended to further support the tabletop and to give you something to attach the base to.

Cutting Instructions

In this plan, I have created two versions for your convenience.

1x6 without Ripping: If you have good 1x6 boards or purchase S4S lumber with square edges, or you want grooves in between your boards (since off the shelf whitewood 1x6 often have rounded edges), follow the plans for the 5-1/2" wide 1x6 boards.

1x6 ripped down to 5-1/4" wide: If you want straight edges, or your 1x6 are less than ideal (for example, vary slightly in width from board to board), run all the 1x6s through the tablesaw, first taking an 1/8" of the first edge.  Then set the tablesaw to 5-1/4" wide and then rip the second side.  Follow the plans for the 5-1/4" wide 1x6 boards.

Cutting Recommendations for Minimal Waste (lengths shown are rounded from cut list, will work with both size tabletops, based off the larger sized tabletop)

8: 24 | 24 | 24 | 24

8: 24 | 24 | 24 | 24

8: 46 | 46

8: 57 | 35

8: 57 | 35

10: 60 | 60

10: 60 | 60

6: 60

Tools
Tape Measure
Pencil
Safety Glasses
Hearing Protection
Kreg Jig
Drill
Miter Saw
Power Sander
Router

Instructions

Step 1

Build the Frame 

Set your compound miter saw to a 22-1/2 degree angle cut.  Cut out all the frame boards.   

Drill two 3/4" pocket holes on ONE end of each of the frame boards, avoiding the outer 2-1/2" as this will be cut off later.

Attach with glue and 1-1/4" pocket hole screws to form a giant ring.

Step 2

Cut the tabletop boards and and layout, matching centers. 

Mark pocket holes about every 8"  and drill 3/4" pocket holes.

Attach the boards together, matching centers, working from one side to the other.  Clamp each joint as you attach.

For this large of a tabletop, if you don't have a worktable that will fit it, two sawhorses with a piece of 3/4" plywood on top will support it.

Glue the tabletop to the frame.  I also recommend 1-1/4" staples and screws to further secure the frame to the tabletop.  Avoid any areas that will be cut off.

Step 3

There are two different ways to cut the circle on the tabletop that I frequently use - and my favorite is actually a combination of the two.  I like to use the circular saw to cut a rough circle, and then finish with a router bit for a nice edge.

Here is a great tutorial on cutting round tabletops with a router.

Here is how we cut our round table with a circular saw.

I don't like to leave square edges on round dining tables, because it is easy for the wood to break off on the hard edge.  So I like to use an ogee but or a roundover bit in the router to clean it up, just letting the router bit follow the circle cut edge.

Step 4

For added strength inside the tabletop, we added 3/4" plywood.  This also give us something to attach the base to.

Finishing Instructions
Preparation Instructions
For the final finish, I sand the entire tabletop in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper.
Then I work up in grit to 220 - or until the tabletop is very smooth.
I always add at least two coats of clear coat, with a very light sanding in between for durability. We did three coats.
Finish Used
Varathane Briarsmoke for color
Three coats of Vartathane Crystal Clear in satin
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