Farmhouse Table - No Pocket Holes Plan

Submitted by Ana White on Wed, 04/17/2019 - 22:15
Difficulty
Intermediate
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Do you want a farmhouse table, but don't want to spend thousands of dollars?  Have you thought about building your own?  Thousands of people have with minimal tools and woodworking experience using these very plans!

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farmhouse table with chairs
farmhouse table featured in country living magazine

The Farmhouse Table Story

Beloved for hundreds of years, the Farmhouse Table was usually made by the family that used it, from wood that was locally harvested, using basic tools.  Soft woods were easier to use, but the soft wood dents easily, and the tables showed wear, creating that authentic distressed look.

Today, a true farmhouse table is just that - built by hand by the family that uses it, using soft woods, and finished by hand.  The tables are meaningful, with each scratch and scuff having a story, each moment creating memory for the family that uses it.

Start your family's Farmhouse Table Story by building your own table, and gathering around it to share a meal, to fold laundry on and do homework on - to create the foundation of your family's home.

The Farmhouse Table Plans

Our Farmhouse Table plans have been built tens of thousands of times and are in homes all over the world. The extremely sturdy, rustic styling is easy to build and authentic to history.

Built out of all off the shelf lumber - builders spend between $50 and $100 making their farmhouse tables.

You just need a saw and a drill to make this farm table.  

Special thanks to ssshindler for the featured photo.

This table was also featured in Country Living Magazine!  Built by Michael and Emily Knotts, photo by Lucas Allen

The plans for this farmhouse table follow.  Also check out these other plans:

Thank you so much for using our plans.  If you build, please share a photo and let us know how your build went in the comments or a brag post.

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Farmhouse Table No Pocket Holes

Dimensions
farmhouse table dimensions
30″ High x 38 1/2″ Wide x 96″ Long

Preparation

Shopping List
  • 8 – 2x4 8 feet long
  • 6 – 2x2s  8 feet long
  • 1 - 2×8  8 feet long
  • 7 – 2x6s 8 feet long
  • 2 3/4″ Self Tapping Wood Screws (About 100) (try spax brand or similar)
  • 4″ Self tapping wood Screws (About 20)
Common Materials
Cut List

A) 4 - 2×4 @ 28 1/2″ (Outside Legs)

B) 4 – 2×4 @ 28 1/2″ (Inside Legs)

C) 2 -2×4 @ 34 1/2″ (Bottom End Supports for the Stretcher)

D) 1 – 2×4 @ 81″ (Stretcher)

E) 2 – 2×4 @ 81″ (Side Aprons)

F) 2 – 2×4 @ 28 1/2″ (End Aprons)

G) 2 – 2×2 @ 28 1/2″ (Overhang Supports, Ends)

H) 2 – 2×2 @ 78″ (Overhang Supports, Sides)

I) 10 – 2×2 @ 28 1/2″ (Under Tabletop Supports)

J) 2 – 2×8 @ 38 1/2″ (Breadboard Ends)

K) 7 – 2×6 @ 81″ (Tabletop Pieces)

Cutting Instructions

Start by cutting all your boards.  The best way to cut is with a compound miter saw.  You can also use a circular saw with a guide - good square cuts are very important.

Tools
Tape Measure
Speed Square
Hammer
Safety Glasses
Hearing Protection
Drill
Circular Saw
Brad Nailer
Power Sander
General Instructions

Always use glue. Use the longest possible screws, and predrill with a countersink bit to hide the screw heads.

Instructions

Step 1

Notch out boards A, the Outside Legs, as shown above. If you do not know how to notch out boards, watch me notch the boards out for my table in my HOW-TO section.

Step 2

Notch out the inside leg as shown above. Make sure you notch both the top and the bottom as shown above. Use the measurements from step 2 to notch the bottom. See the below diagram for a closeup on notching the top.

Step 3

The above diagram show you how to notch out the top of the inside legs.

Step 4

Now screw an inside leg to an outside leg, using glue and 2 3/4″ screws. Be aware of where each leg is placed – it does matter on what sides the inside leg sits. Also, screw through the inside leg into the outside leg to keep your screw holes on the inside.

Step 5

Step 6

Screw the support, C, into the legs, as shown above. Make sure you use 2 screws on the inside leg and 2 screws on the outside legs per side of the end supports. NOTE: If you would like the support to be on the outside, rotate the legs, keeping the inside legs on the inside, and add 4″ to your stretcher, D. This will reduce your leg room for end chairs, but the notch out will be more visible, like my table and the Restoration Hardware table.

Step 7

Put your stretcher in place and screw down.

Step 8

Build your apron on a level surface as shown above, using side apron boards E and end apron boards F.

Step 9

Fit the apron frame into the base of the table as shown above. Use the long screws to screw at an angle through the apron into the legs. Use 3 screws per leg on all legs. Lots of glue here. Now is a good time to check your table for square. Visit the HOW-TO section if you do not know how to check for square.

Step 10

Mark the side apron every 5 3/4″ and place the 2×2 supports, I, as shown above. Remember that a 2×2 is 1 1/2″ wide. This does not have to be exact and the last support will not be exactly 5 3/4″ from the end. Use the 2 3/4″ screws here.

Step 11

Add the overhang supports, G and H, as shown above. Keep the top edges flush, use the 2 3/4″ screws. Make sure you screw these in good.

Step 12

Now the breadboard ends, J. See the below diagram for measurements:

Step 13

Use the long screws to screw the breadboard end into the legs. Then screw from the underside of the overhang support, board G, into the underside of the breadboard end.

Step 14

First mark all the ends of the tabletop boards, K, for the screw pattern. The screw pattern I used was 1″ from the end, and 1″ from each side and one in the middle. Predrill the ends on the marked pattern, as shown above.

Step 15

Then begin adding the tabletop pieces K, starting with the center piece. Screw the center board in place on the ends through the top, pre,drilled and marked in step 15. Then from the underside of the table, screw through the tabletop supports, I, into the underside of the tabletop boards, K.

Step 16

Add the next tabletop boards, K, as shown below. As you screw each board down, take special care to line up the edges with the existing boards. You do not want a gap between the boards on the tabletop. Remember to screw through the top on the ends and then screw through the bottom of the under supports to the underside of the tabletop boards.

After all the boards are screwed in place, then use the long screws to screw through the tabletop boards into the breadboard ends, as shown above.

Finishing Instructions
Finish Used
Fill any wood screw holes with wood filler. Use stain matched wood filler for best stain hiding. For a painted finish, any wood filler works. Overfill the screw holes. Let dry.
Sand the entire table with 120 grit sandpaper, working in the direction of the wood grain.
Refill holes with wood filler if needed.
Sand table with 180 grit sandpaper.
Stain or paint. If the table feels rough between coats, lightly sand with 180 grit sandpaper.
A final coat of poly on the top can help keep the top easy to finish and wipe cleanable.

Comments

Donnie (not verified)

Sun, 12/30/2012 - 15:09

Just finished putting the base together and the table is a little warped and I can't seem to get it straight, any ideas or solutions?

Chris P. (not verified)

Thu, 01/03/2013 - 05:42

Ana (or anyone else) - My wife loves this table, and wants me to make one for her, but after looking at the racks of lumber at Lowes and the other big box and a lumber yard, none of the 2x4s are exactly perfect, which I expected.
So as I was sitting there looking at my choices I started to worry about how a stack of 2x4 would look. So long story short, can someone send me some pictures of how the legs looked when finished?
I found a guy that was using 4x4s instead of the 2x4s, but my problem there is where do I find 4x4 legs that aren't pressure treated?

So if I can get pictures, that would be great! Thanks
C

Rockonnell (not verified)

Mon, 01/07/2013 - 05:17

I used 4x4s from Home Depot. They re untreated Douglas fir. I had them cut to length at the store since my circular saw couldn't handle 4" material. The only real hitch to this is that 1) the top notch that the 2x4 table top frame sits into at the top of the legs will need to be chiseled by hand since you can't do it with a power saw since it is on a corner. It only took about 2 hours to do this carefully for a first timer like me. Measure carefully and work slowly with a sharp chisel. Mine was 1". 2) be aware that using 4x4 stock will slightly throw off the measurements. Allow for the fact that 2 2x4s screwed together are only 3 inches wide by 3 1/2 due to actual measurements vs. labeled measurements. A 4x4 is 3 1/2 x 3 1/2. Just make this adjustment on the line drawings above. Basically it means that the finished gap on the ends of the tables between the table legs will be one inch narrower. I hope this helps.

lincey23

Fri, 02/22/2013 - 08:41

Was curiuos as to about how much it costs to make this table and the benches to go with it, was thinking about making one.

AshleyHaney

Sat, 03/02/2013 - 20:37

My husband and father just built this for me and I love it! They used Cedar lumber, which did cost a little more, but just looks amazing! :)

jc9794

Thu, 04/18/2013 - 18:15

I usually have large family dinners and I am going to make this table longer. Instead of using the 7 2x6x81" boards, I am going to use 7 2x6x10' boards.
My concern is the stretcher board underneath might bow a little bit and/or if I need additional support, where would you place it. If anyone has diagrams they can share to show there lengthened table and any modifications, it would be deeply appreciated.

Thank you

jc9794

Thu, 04/18/2013 - 18:15

I usually have large family dinners and I am going to make this table longer. Instead of using the 7 2x6x81" boards, I am going to use 7 2x6x10' boards.
My concern is the stretcher board underneath might bow a little bit and/or if I need additional support, where would you place it. If anyone has diagrams they can share to show there lengthened table and any modifications, it would be deeply appreciated.

Thank you

Allen Lulu

Sun, 05/05/2013 - 11:41

I am hoping one day to build this table but I really want a bench for my dining room. It looks like the Modern Farm Table but is it that? Or is there another bench for this table that I just can't find the plans for?

Allen Lulu

Sun, 05/05/2013 - 14:25

Dumb question. What kind of sander do you recommend for this project? I only have a handheld, but I'm thinking that a power sander might be a better solution. Thoughts?

yorheal75

Thu, 05/16/2013 - 16:12

It is very rare these days to find blogs that provide information someone is looking for. I am glad to see that your blog share valued information that can help to many readers. Thanks and keep writing.-YOR Health

kariusername

Tue, 06/04/2013 - 10:42

I would LOVE it if you could provide plans to add drawers on the long side of this table. I remember my grandparents had an old kitchen table with drawers for napkins and extra cutlery and as kids we always thought it was so cool. Fast forward many decades and my table doubles as a desk and I would love to be able to store my laptop, calculator and misc office supplies in a drawer under the table. http://www.potterybarn.com/products/norfolk-dining-table/?pkey=csquare-…

tivicak

Tue, 06/11/2013 - 08:39

Has anyone ever had any concerns on the 4x4 posts, used for the legs, twisting or warping? I've been thinking of laminating posts from 1x's.

bbradfor

Mon, 06/17/2013 - 14:22

Im about to start this project but am going to use a zinc top rather than wood. Pics soon to come!

bbradfor

Mon, 06/17/2013 - 14:23

Im about to start this project but am going to use a zinc top rather than wood. Pics soon to come!

jawoods

Tue, 07/02/2013 - 20:28

How do you take the table apart if you need to move it? Looking through the plans I don't see how it's possible, so if you could clue me in that'd be great! Thanks :)

claydowling

Wed, 07/03/2013 - 06:03

This table isn't meant to be taken apart. It's not a terribly difficult change to make if you would like to take it apart. At one time I built tables like this for sale, but I had to stop. I do have a video of my daughter assembling on though, and there's a close up of the joint you can look at, so you can build your own. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESCdiohSOHM

tcollins1965

Sat, 07/20/2013 - 19:17

Are there alternate plans for the farmhouse table for different lengths? My wife and I love it, but 96" is way too long for our house. We are looking for something in the 72" range.

kossnh

Sat, 08/10/2013 - 18:37

This table plan is great. Do you have any suggestions to add a table leaf to this plan or do you have other dining table plans that include a leaf? Thank you.

dana16

Sun, 08/11/2013 - 22:16

I'd like to build this table , but I don't understand exactly how I'm to screw the table top boards to the breadboard ends in step 17. The depiction is missing. Thanks, Dana Harris

Leah Michigander

Thu, 12/26/2013 - 11:30

Hi Ana,

I'm so excited to try out this plan! But I'm concerned about steps 16-19. Are the images for these steps missing? I think I can figure everything out except for step 17. I'm not sure I understand that one.

Thanks for all that you do!

mpupillo76

Fri, 05/02/2014 - 22:31

If I want a longer table what cuts do I need to take into consideration while doing this? I'm thinking everything cut at 81" are the only cuts that would change. Is correct?

3deacs

Fri, 06/27/2014 - 18:20

I am in love with this table. I plan to start this project for our new home :). Can anyone tell me the name of the "weathered stain" used in the Country Living Magazine?

Thanks so much!

kat.rowe92

Sun, 07/20/2014 - 13:01

If I am trying to make the table about 5' before I put the breadboard ends on. I'm pretty sure I just need to change the lengths of the stretcher, side aprons, and table top boards. Does that sound right?

kat.rowe92

Sun, 07/20/2014 - 13:02

If I am trying to make the table about 5' before I put the breadboard ends on. I'm pretty sure I just need to change the lengths of the stretcher, side aprons, and table top boards. Does that sound right?

Tracy Goode

Tue, 12/02/2014 - 14:57

My only real question is how difficult is it to move this table? My family is looking at moving from our current home in the future; as a former mover, if this cannot come apart for moving, it's going to take up a lot of space in a moving van, leading to higher costs.

Tracy Goode

Tue, 12/02/2014 - 14:57

My only real question is how difficult is it to move this table? My family is looking at moving from our current home in the future; as a former mover, if this cannot come apart for moving, it's going to take up a lot of space in a moving van, leading to higher costs.

louyoung

Tue, 08/11/2015 - 16:57

Hi Ana,

I've just bought some wood for this project.  I couldn't find pine in this size at my local hardware, so i went to a timber yard and bought hardwood.  Thought it would also last longer and look great in my home.

I'm quite new to this stuff, so i'm very nervous about cutting my wood and building the table.  Do you think i will need to add more support due to the heaviness of the hardwood?

Any other tips for using hardwood would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Louise

perfectlyflwed

Tue, 12/01/2015 - 06:42

After time has gone by how has the table held up?  How much if any did the table top boards warp, expand, etc?  Love the table but would like to know how it's fairing after time.

smwood

Thu, 01/07/2016 - 10:13

Do these plans actually call for the brad nailer? I read through them and didnt see where it was used. Figuring out if I need to purchase or not.

 

louyoung

Thu, 03/17/2016 - 19:05

Hi Anna,

I need your help, i'm not sure how to screw the top piece in at step 8, do i screw in on each side of the corners? Or directly at the interesection of the corner?

I have used a hard wood and its getting tough to predrill.  Also my table is a little wobbily so far. Any advice?

Thanks,

Louise

mrs_sgt_myh

Fri, 04/08/2016 - 08:35

My first question may seem silly, but I'm a serious beginner here! What type of wood did you use? I was looking at Douglas Fir but have heard its very soft and won't work.

 

Secondly, Kreg Jig... which one will do? I'm looking at the R3 Junior OR the K4 System? Hoping to not spend the price of the table on a tool LOL

 

Thanks! :)

moonprysm

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 19:13

The lumber list on this project doesn't say the length of the boards purchased... 8 - 2x4s...but are they 2x4x8, 2x4x10, 2x4x12, or 2x4x16? Etc.

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